Sky

 

‘Halloween Walk Night Just started to edit…liked the sky!’

Technical: Nikon D90, 1/30 sec, f4.2, focal length 36

Susan, you have mixed light at twilight. It’s a difficult time of day. You have incandescent light and you have sunlight. The sky is too bright so it overpowers the image. It is blown out. To lower the exposure for the sky you would lose the foreground into deep shadow. It’s beyond the capability of the image sensor. Here’s where you might shoot raw or you do a bracketed series of exposures and use HDR. I know that this is too technical. But there’s no practical way to make this image work in one shot. Aim to the left and let the bright sky go. Or move to the right and get a silhouette.

Advertisements

Love

Technical: Nikon D90, 1/80 sec, f9, focal length 18

FARNSWORTH MUSEUM BRINGS LOVE TO ROCKLAND, ME

Susan emailed that she likes the play of the leaves’ shadows over the sculpture. Another recent news story about ‘love’ in Maine revolves around a one woman brothel run from a dance studio in southern Maine near to former President George Bush’s Maine compound. She shot video (of course) and the latest news is about who’s being ‘outed.’ This image is a lot more innocent. I actually like the vertical crop of this square sculpture. The subject is isolated and distracting background is kept to a minimum. The shadows do indeed add some interest. Good job Susan.

Home

iPhone

Julia’s on the move again. New apartment and she’s letting me have a look. It’s not art. It’s illustration. That’s my photo there in the corner. Julia had it framed and she has taken it to hang in the new place. Thanks. It’s home for now. She’ll be on the move again in a year. Yup, that’s the plan. All the best.

Day At The Beach

Technical: Nikon D90, 1/400 sec, f10, focal length 105

WINGAERSHEEK BEACH PERFECT DAY TODAY AT THE BEACH

I have nothing to add about this shot. I like the orange color. You could play around with the composition. I think you have been pausing before you push the shutter. That’s a good thing. And take a couple after you got the first image. You might be able to get something better. It’s hard with what I call a ‘grab shot.’ For instance, I’d have tried to position the sailboat a bit more to the side. It means that you would move to the side. Of course the moment would be gone when the kids moved also.

Mixed lighting

Technical: iPhone 4s, 1/16 sec, f2.4, focal length 4.28

That iPhone got a workout. Lots of shots between the Endeavor and the party. This one looks like a self portrait. The color balance is not swell. Flash is just a bit too bright. But it’s nice to see my son happy and enjoying the evening. When you consider the conditions, the young folks have made an art out of taking their own pictures.

 

A Little Zoom

Technical: Canon G11, 1/400 sec, f4.5, focal length 30.5

I’m still getting the hang of a higher zoom. You don’t look thru the viewfinder or at the LCD. You just point and shoot. It means you get a lot of duds. Fish are the challenge. If I’ve said it once… the slow moving ones are the most forgiving. I’d very much like to put a DSLR to the test. And… a proper flash. But for now it’s a paparazzi style that is working.

Ray

Technical: Canon G11, 1/100 sec, f4, focal length 13

The subtle blue color cast is easily fixed in Photoshop. That is just part of the consideration in this image. My friend Farid was prodding it along so I would have an action shot. So here I am sort of swimming and panning on the fly. Hey, it worked. Your subjects really don’t pose for you as much as you’d like. So I shot. The delay in shutter and exposure can be annoying. There’s no motor drive here. It does make you more deliberate in pressing the shutter.

Editing

Technical: Canon G11, 1/320 sec, f4.5, focal length 30.5

A little Photoshop can go a long way. I’ve other shots of this fish with more rich brown coloring. But it appears this guy is really black and white. Even for fish it’s the eye. There’s a little catch light and it looks more appealing. This is a big fat fish with little fins and I figured it couldn’t swim fast. Wrong. It’s faster than me. I did a little zoom. The problem with zooming is finding and keeping your subject in the image frame.

 

Top Down View

Technical: Canon G11, 1/160 sec, f4.5, focal length 30.5

Hmm…. The settings are the same as the previous image. I don’t much bother with manual. It’s tough underwater to juggle the settings. Shooting fish is a challenge. I guess I like a side view to get the shape of the fish and one eye in focus. Traditional, catalog, fish book – plain vanilla image, and it’s kind of boring. I’m still just trying to get the hang of water, and the camera housing. So bear with me. Some fish are bottom swimming. Try to get a side view of this one, that’s tough. It’s better if they aren’t moving. Curiously my dive instructor doesn’t seem interested too much in shooting fish. And to me, shooting coral is like taking pictures of trees. It’s not too hard to shoot something that can’t move.

Chipmunk

Technical: Nikon D90, 1/125 sec, f5.6, focal length 170

Kevin has a thing about chipmunks. He hates them. It’s good he doesn’t have a gun. But Susan shot this one. The upper leaves are overexposed. It’s because there is too much dynamic range in the light. To make it simpler, the upper background is too bright. You can compensate in the camera. Usually the meter will under expose the chipmunk. In order to get everything to look naturally unnatural, you would shoot two images exposing for the light and dark. Or, you could shoot raw and manipulate in Photoshop. I’m less inclined to overthink the image. If you’ll notice the chipmunk is pretty dead center in the image. It tends to get that way when you don’t take time to compose because the critter will only be there a split second.