Stormy

Technical: Nikon D90, 1.200 sec, f4, focal length 18

Hurricane…not so close to the water as it looks! I like the light here…sand…white caps – Susan

Susan, it’s perspective. A photo is a 2D image and depth of field cannot be accurately gauged on a flat image. So yes, the waves looks closer and the effect is nice. There’s not much texture in the sky, but one can’t complain. You have a good shot of the kids. I presume the wind was not to fierce to be a danger.

Lynx

 

Technical: Canon DSLR

I’m guessing lynx. Jennifer did not provide details and she stripped the metadata. It’s a very nice image for a relative beginner. Good cropping and detail. The detail in the eyes is especially good with the catch light on the corneas. People tend to get the whole head or the whole animal. The eyes are the focus. And Jen has done this well.

Home

iPhone

Julia’s on the move again. New apartment and she’s letting me have a look. It’s not art. It’s illustration. That’s my photo there in the corner. Julia had it framed and she has taken it to hang in the new place. Thanks. It’s home for now. She’ll be on the move again in a year. Yup, that’s the plan. All the best.

Fall and Orange

Technical: Nikon D90, 1/200 sec, f14, focal length 18

Susan kept the pumpkins in the corner for their leaf shadows. Otherwise everything is color coordinated – leaves, farm equipment, both kids clothes, and of course the pumpkins. This shot is a good example of depth of field and focus. The f14 stop is sufficient to get you both grand kids in reasonable focus. They are both on the run. Auto focus caught the scene in detail. There are finer points on action shooting. Knowing Susan, she let auto focus do it’s magic. And she got a good shot. For action a key is shutter speed. You need a fast speed to stop the action. The focus points – there are variations per camera. You can set them up to follow the action. You can set them catch the closest subject. And then there is dynamic focus which allows you to focus on the central subject and follow their movement. It’s all right there in the camera manual. Remember that thing of paper that came with your camera? It actually makes for good reading to know what some of those extra buttons on the camera are. On the Nikon it’s right there on the back right, near to the shutter. Yeah, I used it when I shot the US Tennis Open, but not since. Still, it’s good to know there are options. Usually when you shoot the kids, it catch as catch can, and not about a time out for technical camera adjustments. It’s just good to know that there are other options. Cute shot, very cute shot!

Blackfish

Technical: Canon G11, 1/250 sec, f4, focal length 18

We were in a holding pattern at 15 feet to decompress before surfacing. No dice. I popped straight to the surface and couldn’t get my butt down for beans. So I hovered and shot this image. The light is brighter so the shutter speed is faster. There was just no way to coordinate and pose this feeding mass of black fish. Something was tasty on the reef. There’s not too much to love here. You can see an eye or two. The composition is … ugh. There’s not to much detail or color except for the blue edging. I have a lot of these images. I thought to show some mistakes, lest you believe everything comes out great.

Flatfish

Technical: Canon G11, 1/200 sec, f4, focal length 18

I’d have never seen this fish except that it was on the move. The human eye is accustomed to see threat and anything moving is noticed first. I cropped to get this close up. You lose detail as you crop more. But here it’s not possible to salvage the image unless you crop. Otherwise I have a whole lot of homogenous boring sand in the image. With macro focus I could have tried for the eyes. That would have been a shot. But I did not have the time and could not get in close. My BCD kept pulling me toward the surface.

Red Coral

Technical: Canon G11, 1/160 sec, f4.5, focal length 30.5

The trick here is to recognize that this coral is red. I have images with flash in which the red is brilliant neon. The lighting here was custom white balance and natural, no flash. The color is definitely different than using flash. It’s a matter of taste. I tend to like the more brilliant color, not this image. But then it’s a matter of reality, poetry or prose.

Clownfish

Technical: Canon G11, 1/80 sec, f3.5, focal length 13.7

Clownfish are often symbiotically seen with this coral anemone. And about as often there is one larger than the other in the pair. Neither fish eye is in sharp focus. The shutter speed is relatively slow. I was shooting natural light, custom white balance. Focus on moving objects is a challenge and even more so underwater. You can make an image look sharper by dialing down the exposure or increasing the contrast. It will help. I’m just happy with the image but it is not my best and it is not a keeper.

NYC Public Library

Technical: Canon EOS, 1/10 sec, f3.5, focal length 10

People go to the library to read. Nowadays you can get internet access and freedom of speech lets you look at pornography while other patrons pass by. There is fine line between offensive and illegal. On the other hand if you don’t carry a camera with you, this will be a shot you will miss.

Here’s a great way to use wide angle perspective. David shot in mixed light and the color balance is pleasing. The off center composition leads you nicely to the pedestrians. I wonder if you might have experimented with a zoom lens. On a tripod with a zoom lens, you change the focal length as you take a long image. I recall you did this another time. The lines in this image would probably have made a good shot. Otherwise this is one fine shot. I would consider cropping the out of focus marble on the left. It’s distracting.

Motion Freeze Hi Speed Sync

Technical: Canon EOS, 1/5000 sec, f2.8, focal length 60

I thought that David did a splendid job with the other bee (see August 22). I like this shot better. It it a harder shot to obtain because the focusing is critical. See the wings. The high shutter speed captures the wings in mid beat. Depth of field is narrow. Now for the hard part, get this shot head on with the compound eyes in focus. Hey, I’d be just tickled to have this shot or the other. Either way it was a great technical accomplishment. David got his desired effect in that he wanted the wings to be in focus and stopped by the flash.