Taxi … Pan

 

No technical info

Jennifer has done the same technique. Here the taxi is not quite in focus. The background is blurred. The taxi could be more inside the frame of the image but that is also editorial. In terms of the technical aspect, it’s a good try but not a ‘keeper.’ Someone else has done this and done it better. Still it’s a great effort from an amateur photographer.

Advertisements

Run… Pan

 

No technical info

Jennifer indicates that this is her attempt at panning. It’s a good one. The girl with the yellow hat is in focus while all around her the other elements are blurred. It’s a good way to isolate your subject from a confusing background. To do this one needs to use a slow shutter and move the camera with the direction of the subject’s movement. In this case left to right. If you are accurate, you will come up with something like this. You can also achieve this effect in Photoshop. But it’s more fun in camera.

Roller Coaster

No technical info.

Jennifer sent this. She did not take the photo. It raises a copyright thought. But since it is a universal disaster picture of the recent hurricane and there are probably a thousand generic images, copyright is not an issue. It might be so if it were a unique image that was instantly recognizable. Meanwhile it’s a roller coaster that is no more.

Hurricane

 

Technical: Nikon D90, 1.200 sec, f4, focal length 18

Well you can at least tell that this is a stormy day. The lighting belies the storm. I didn’t check but presume you used fill flash as usual. This helps the exposure. But it takes away the gloomy mood of an impending storm. It’s another decision you make as to whether to get a good exposure or to play to the mood of the day. With all those colorful clothes this would not have been a shot to convert to black and white.

Cacti

 

Technical: Canon DSLR

Jennifer went to the zoo and sent me some early edits of her trip. It was the San Diego zoo. I’m a sucker for deep blue sky. The cactus in the foreground is the main subject. The shadows are a problem. Once again the bright background sky is too much for the foreground shadows. It’s otherwise a nice graphical image. And yes, that bright blue sky….

Sky

 

‘Halloween Walk Night Just started to edit…liked the sky!’

Technical: Nikon D90, 1/30 sec, f4.2, focal length 36

Susan, you have mixed light at twilight. It’s a difficult time of day. You have incandescent light and you have sunlight. The sky is too bright so it overpowers the image. It is blown out. To lower the exposure for the sky you would lose the foreground into deep shadow. It’s beyond the capability of the image sensor. Here’s where you might shoot raw or you do a bracketed series of exposures and use HDR. I know that this is too technical. But there’s no practical way to make this image work in one shot. Aim to the left and let the bright sky go. Or move to the right and get a silhouette.

Love

Technical: Nikon D90, 1/80 sec, f9, focal length 18

FARNSWORTH MUSEUM BRINGS LOVE TO ROCKLAND, ME

Susan emailed that she likes the play of the leaves’ shadows over the sculpture. Another recent news story about ‘love’ in Maine revolves around a one woman brothel run from a dance studio in southern Maine near to former President George Bush’s Maine compound. She shot video (of course) and the latest news is about who’s being ‘outed.’ This image is a lot more innocent. I actually like the vertical crop of this square sculpture. The subject is isolated and distracting background is kept to a minimum. The shadows do indeed add some interest. Good job Susan.

Detail

Technical: Nikon D90, 1/200 sec, f14, focal length 20

Susan sent me two shots. It was hard for her to choose. There’s something to like about both. It’s a matter of taste since only one will make the final cut. And the discarded one will languish on your hard drive never to brighten your monitor again, an orphan. Ahh… tugging on your heartstrings…(Susie, Kevin says, never throws out anything.) As to digital images, why throw out anything. Actually Susan does discard images to make room on her memory card. And, I actually don’t discard any images. So everything I shoot stays buried on the hard drive. My hard edits (everyone seems to have their own system) leaves me with about 10% of keepers. Try as I might I can’t whittle the number down much more than that. And at that number you are asking for boredom to settle in among your viewers. There are a few really outstanding shots. And then there are the collections of events. Of the two shots Susan sent, I like this one. We see the figure without an explanation. As to the plate, you still need someone to wonder what was going on. It’s a good thing to have too many good images. Keep in mind that the National Geographic guys edit thousands of shots to a single or two, which illustrate the article. Tough.

 

 

 

Sharing

Technical: Nikon D90, 1/200 sec, f14, focal length 20

FOUND AN ARMY MAN IN THE SAND…SO YOU PUT DOWN YOUR SNACK PLATE AND STEP ON IT !???? WINGAERSHEEK BEACH, GLOUCESTER

Just a couple of dudes sharing a moment, eh Susan? As to why stand on the plate…? If you’re environmental, you don’t want that plate to fly away. You’ve heard of flying saucers? You need the caption to tell what they are holding. Some illustrations need explanation. I did wonder why stand on the plate, too. To be picky, you could have moved the horizon down a little to isolate the heads and hands against that great blue sky background.

Shuttle Endeavor

Technical: iPhone 4s, 1/4608 sec, f2.4, focal length 4.28

David was in California and shot this image as the Shuttle Endeavor went by. I believe it piggybacks to a B-747. This is a rare treat and likely not to be repeated as the shuttles are retired. So you have one of a kind there, son. The iPhone never ceases to amaze with what it can capture. Without it there’s no shot. So I have to agree that it’s better to have it than not. I’m almost ready to give in.